On the same day as we let Cieba go, we had to do the same for Larick.

Old man Larick, what can I say? He was probably an ideal LDG. He loved his goaties, was tolerant of us, and guarded ferociously against strangers and predators alike.

Larick as a gangling youngster
Larick as a gangling youngster

He came to us not long after we first arrived in Colorado, along with his brother Rowan and half-brother Mitch and protected us and our livestock (or should I say HIS livestock?) well for ten years. He survived being bitten on the face by a rattlesnake, probably thanks to Melisa using essential oils on him to calm the swelling, combat the venom and ease the pain. He was better with Melisa, but merely tolerant of me, at least up until the later stages of his life at which point he would come to me to be petted. He would not only guard against ground based predators, but would also keep an eye on the sky too for those pesky eagles, hawks, owls and other large birds that may want to do HIS goat kids harm. But for the kids themselves he would happily lay on the ground and let them use him as their personal climbing frame. I came to the conclusion that it was a rite of passage for each goat kid to make it to the highest point on Mount Larick.

Larick, looking after the kids
Larick, looking after the kids

 

Larick on patrol
Larick on patrol

After his falling out with Toobies, the newcomer, Larick spent the last few month of his life as a house dog. He had only once been in the cabin in Colorado before and, that time, couldn’t wait to get out. But for his short retirement he adapted very well to the comforts of the house, though I do believe he missed his goat kids. It was a sad day at Alba Ranch when we had to say goodbye to him.

retired Larick sharing his breakfast with a kitten
retired Larick sharing his breakfast with a kitten

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